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guide to print
“Colours, like features, follow the changes of the emotions.”

Pablo Picasso
3. paper

In the beginning there was un-coated paper (i.e. paper with no finish on the surface) such as the type you get in most paperback books, commonly known as cartridge (I believe this is because it was used to wrap gun powder originally which is why it is called cartridge paper). Then the first coated papers were developed and were used in a limited fashion (used in picture sections in books because they were more suited for reproduction of pictures and images). Today there are a lot of different types of papers available, cartridge papers (often called offset), silk, matt and gloss finishes (all these are coatings applied to the paper during or after manufacture which give it different properties) as well as numerous specialist and coloured papers. In very rough terms though – un-coated papers take longer to dry and absorb the ink more (so less lift on colour) but are far more tactile. Coated papers are far better at colour (and solid) reproduction but are far less tactile. There have recently been new developments which are papers that reproduce like a coated sheet but have the tactile feel of an un-coated (papers like Omnia and Zen). Paper is sold and measured in GSM (no of Grams per Square Metre – this means you can take a square metre of a given paper and weigh it – this will be the number of grams per square metre) this will vary from around 40gsm up to 700gsm, although the majority of papers tend to start around 90gsm and go up to 300gsm. A very rough guide for choice of grams would be on a brochure a text being on between a 100gsm and 150gsm and a cover between 200gsm and 300gsm. The exception to GSM is when dealing with heavier and some un-coated boards where this is measured in microns (thickness), 1000 microns = 1mm.

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prepress

AT PRINCIPAL COLOUR WE TAKE CARE OF THE PREPRESS PROCESS. WE WILL TAKE EXTRA CARE TO MAKE SURE YOUR ARTWORK IS SET UP CORRECTLY.